Ultrasonic Sensor. HC-SR04 Datasheet

HC-SR04 Sensor. Datasheet pdf. Equivalent

HC-SR04 Datasheet
Recommendation HC-SR04 Datasheet
Part HC-SR04
Description Ultrasonic Sensor
Feature HC-SR04; HC­SR04 Ultrasonic Sensor  Elijah J. Morgan  Nov. 16 2014      The purpose of this file is to explai.
Manufacture ETC
Datasheet
Download HC-SR04 Datasheet




ETC HC-SR04
HC­SR04 Ultrasonic Sensor 
Elijah J. Morgan 
Nov. 16 2014 
 
 
The purpose of this file is to explain how the HC­SR04 works. It will give a brief 
explanation of how ultrasonic sensors work in general. It will also explain how to wire 
the sensor up to a microcontroller and how to take/interpret readings. It will also discuss 
some sources of errors and bad readings. 
 
1. How Ultrasonic Sensors Work 
2. HC­SR04 Specifications 
3. Timing chart, Pin explanations and Taking 
Distance Measurements 
4. Wiring HC­SR04 with a microcontroller 
5. Errors and Bad Readings 
 
1. How Ultrasonic Sensors Work 
Ultrasonic sensors use sound to determine the distance between the sensor and the 
closest object in its path. How do ultrasonic sensors do this? Ultrasonic sensors are 
essentially sound sensors, but they operate at a frequency above human hearing.  
The sensor sends out a sound wave at a specific frequency. It then listens for that specific 
sound wave to bounce off of an object and come back (Figure 1). The sensor keeps track 
of the time between sending the sound wave and the sound wave returning. If you know 
how fast something is going and how long it is traveling you can find the distance 
traveled with equation 1. 
 
Equation 1.   d = v × t  
 
The speed of sound can be calculated based on the a variety of atmospheric 
conditions, including temperature, humidity and pressure. Actually calculating the 
distance will be shown later on in this document. 
It should be noted that ultrasonic sensors have a cone of detection, the angle of 
this cone varies with distance, Figure 2 show this relation. The ability of a sensor to 



ETC HC-SR04
detect an object also depends on the objects orientation to the sensor. If an object doesn’t 
present a flat surface to the sensor then it is possible the sound wave will bounce off the 
object in a way that it does not return to the sensor. 
 
 
2. HC­SR04 Specifications 
The sensor chosen for the Firefighting Drone Project was the HC­SR04. This 
section contains the specifications and why they are important to the sensor module. The 
sensor modules requirements are as follows. 
● Cost 
● Weight 
● Community of hobbyists and support 
● Accuracy of object detection 
● Probability of working in a smoky environment 
● Ease of use 
The HC­SR04 Specifications are listed below. These specifications are from the 
Cytron Technologies HC­SR04 User’s Manual (source 1).  
 
Power Supply: +5V DC 
Quiescent Current: <2mA 
Working current: 15mA 
Effectual Angle: <15º 
Ranging Distance: 2­400 cm 
Resolution: 0.3 cm 
Measuring Angle: 30º 
Trigger Input Pulse width: 10uS 
Dimension: 45mm x 20mm x 15mm 
Weight: approx. 10 g 
 
The HC­SR04’s best selling point is its price; it can be purchased at around $2 per 
unit. 
 



ETC HC-SR04
 
 
3. Timing Chart and Pin Explanations 
The HC­SR04 has four pins, VCC, GND, TRIG and ECHO; these pins all have 
different functions. The VCC and GND pins are the simplest ­­ they power the HC­SR04. 
These pins need to be attached to a +5 volt source and ground respectively. There is a 
single control pin: the TRIG pin. The TRIG pin is responsible for sending the ultrasonic 
burst. This pin should be set to HIGH for 10 μs, at which point the HC­SR04 will send 
out an eight cycle sonic burst at 40 kHZ. After a sonic burst has been sent the ECHO pin 
will go HIGH. The ECHO pin is the data pin ­­ it is used in taking distance 
measurements. After an ultrasonic burst is sent the pin will go HIGH, it will stay high 
until an ultrasonic burst is detected back, at which point it will go LOW. 
Taking Distance Measurements 
The HC­SR04 can be triggered to send out an ultrasonic burst by setting the TRIG 
pin to HIGH. Once the burst is sent the ECHO pin will automatically go HIGH. This pin 
will remain HIGH until the the burst hits the sensor again. You can calculate the distance 
to the object by keeping track of how long the ECHO pin stays HIGH. The time ECHO 
stays HIGH is the time the burst spent traveling.  Using this measurement in equation 1 
along with the speed of sound will yield the distance travelled. A summary of this is 
listed below, along with a visual representation in Figure 2. 
 
1. Set TRIG to HIGH 
2. Set a timer when ECHO goes to HIGH 
3. Keep the timer running until ECHO goes to LOW 
4. Save that time 
5. Use equation 1 to determine the distance travelled 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Source 2 





@ 2014 :: Datasheetspdf.com :: Semiconductors datasheet search & download site (Privacy Policy & Contact)